All the best for 2018 !

Dear Pangloss friends;

2017 has been a good year for me and I am hoping also a good year for you and your loved ones.
I am happy with the Pangloss performance and at the same time recognise that there are areas that we need to improve on.

Many milestones have been reached by each lab, by each commission and by many projects and congratulations to all for this.

We have also had many successful training sessions, workshops, aperos, speeddatings and events and so I can go on.

Many of you have spent much time in our innovation space, and each time we see each other at Pangloss, there is a spark, there is an idea, there is a concept in the air, which may one day become a co-creation opportunity.

We welcomed many new members in 2017 and thank you to all for making them feel at home. It has been great having new perspectives come on board.

Each one of us need to manage this work life balance more carefully as no success can compensate for failure in the home.

I have enjoyed working with each one of you and have come to know almost each of you personally. This has been a highlight in itself.

Another highlight has been the Fete de la Science, with a record number of visitors and animations.

It is sad when some of our team members have to leave particularly when it is because of a professional move to Marseille, to San Francisco, to Africa, to the Vosges or because of some other personal circumstances. Luckily enough some of them are coming back !!!

I wish to thank all of you for your continued support and dedication to Pangloss. I wish to thank our bureau for their decisions, our Conseil d’Administration for their propositions and tradeoffs, our Conciergerie for welcoming new members with a smile everyday and for their great support in having such a wonderful hypercreativity space and ecological fablab, open for everyone.

We are proud that this space is so open, so unique, so creative and so inclusive.

Congratulations to the Pangloss members who won awards this year (Concours Lepine, Trip to Brussels for Economie Circulaire, CES 2018 Nomination…).

We will have the opportunity to share with you all the numbers during our next General Assembly. We are confident they will look good.

I wish all of you a wonderful end of the year and a happy and prosperous 2018.

Let’s make 2018 a fun, successful and value adding year that changes the lives of people for the positive. Let not that which matters the most be affected by that which matters the least.

Yves

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Closing the loop: Innovation for a Circular Economy

On Wednesday 6th December, 2017, Paul Bristow represented Pangloss Labs along with 5 other startups with innovations in the circular economy in Brussels .  We were chosen from across all of the EU to participate in a high-level policy discussion at the European Parliament, hosted by Nespresso and the EU40.

MEPs Franc Bogovic (EPP, Slovenia) and Davor Skrlec (Greens/EFA, Croatia) hosted the roundtable debate preceded by six start-ups that pitched their innovations and spice up the discussion.

The agenda included:

12:30 – 12:50 Networking Lunch
12:50 – 13:15 Dragon’s Den – start-ups’ pitch presenting their innovation including a vote
13:15 – 14:30 High-level discussion

Moderated by Peter Woodward, the high-level discussion aimed at engaging stakeholders in a consumer-focused debate – how to raise awarenessfoster public acceptance among end-users and accelerate transition towards the circular economy.

MEP Seb Dance, VP Mairead McGuinness, MEP Giovanni La Via, MEP Jakop Dalunde and MEP Inmaculada Rodriguez-Piñero introduced circular economy startups from their own country and were joined by MEP Gesine Meissner who spoke at the high-level policy debate, as well as Kęstutis Sadauskas, Director for the Green Economy at DG Environment.

The six startups, selected by Nestlé Nespresso from across Europe, were:

  • Pangloss Labs (France) – 21st century local manufacturing.  See our complete pitch below

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Fête de la Science 2017

Pangloss Labs and the City of Ferney-Voltaire organize in partnership the Science Fair in the Pays de Gex on Saturday 14 October 2017

 La Fête de la Science

Created in 1991 at the initiative of Hubert Curien, then Minister of Research, the “Fete de la Science”, which became a national event, aims to bring citizens closer to science.

Each year throughout France, hundreds of actors offer free workshops, conferences, screenings, exhibitions, open their laboratory, discover the cultural and scientific heritage of the territory. From biodiversity to mathematics to the sciences of the universe, but also from human and social sciences, this event aims to represent all scientific domains and to make the world of science free to the public.

Throughout France, the Science Fair takes place from 7 to 15 October 2017.

For this 26th edition, the 2,500 participating municipalities propose stands and animations around the theme “Ideas received and critical spirit”

The Fête de la Science in the Pays de Gex, Saturday 14 October

In partnership with the Ferney-Voltaire Mairie, Pangloss Labs is organising the Fête de la Science (Science Fair) in the Pays de Gex on Saturday 14th October.

This event will be an opportunity for young and old to meet innovation entrepreneurs from the Pays de Gex and to discover the innovation laboratories of Pangloss:

  • Mobility and Town Planning
  • Health/Wellness
  • Connected objects
  • Sustainable development
  • Culture and education

Around the theme “Critical spirit and received ideas”, the Fête de la Science in Ferney-Voltaire will be an opportunity to explore:

  • electric mobility with the Vega association
  • astronomy with Orion
  • creative laboratories with Addictlab design
  • the connected objects
  • the innovations of citizen democracy
  • and so many other discoveries …

A philosophical debate/conference will be organized at 5 pm, with Geneviève Brykman, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Paris Nanterre on the theme “Voltaire and received ideas”.

« The more the human being is enlightened, the more he will be free » – Voltaire

Pangloss Labs

Samedi 14 octobre de 9h à 18h

12 bis rue de Gex
Résidence Joseph Boisson
01210 Ferney Voltaire
Tel : 04 50 59 07 83

www.panglosslabs.org

Contacts : yves@panglosslabs.org, guillaume@panglosslabs.org

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Pangloss @ #UNHCRNGOs

On June 14th 2017, representatives from Pangloss Labs were invited to participate to the UNHCR annual consultation with NGOs.  From the sustainable development innovation lab, Paul, Charlie & Gianluca decided to dedicate one day to this.  With our partners from the Global Humanitarian Lab (based at the Palais de Nations), we exhibited some of the things that digital fabrication – and more importantly the entrepreneurial, problem solving mindset around it – could enable in refugee environments.   

It was an eye-opening day for all of us, and each of us decided to tell the story in our own words.

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Générer du beau

Vous vous êtes certainement posé les questions suivantes sur la beauté

«Qu’est-ce qui est beau ? »

«Comment être beau? Existe-t-il une méthode, une recette pour faire du beau ?»

«Pourquoi moi je trouve ça beau mais pas les autres ? »

Un proverbe arabe dit : « la beauté est dans l’œil qui regarde ». En fait la réponse de notre être à l’esthétique, est purement personnelle, et dépend de nombreux facteurs culturels et émotionnels.

La beauté d’un visage par exemple peut être appréciée comme une absence de défaut. C’est la beauté qui rassure quant à son vécu personnel. Mais au contraire cela peut être une aspérité qui étonne au lieu de susciter notre rejet.

Dans la réponse esthétique, on trouve le plus souvent une émotion qu’il est difficile de comprendre pour soi et encore plus d’expliquer aux autres.

Un jour j’ai découvert l’univers de l’espace mathématiques de Mandelbrot. D’abord subjugué par la richesse des images produites à partir d’un simple zoom sur un point particulier de cet espace, où les formes se répétaient avec des variations étonnantes, je me suis fait expliquer ce qui générait ces formes.

La réponse était étonnante. La fonction génératrice était l’étude de suite, dans le simple plan des complexes, dont on étudiait la vitesse de convergence.

On donnait une couleur au point à partir duquel la suite était calculée, en fonction de sa vitesse de convergence.

Un élève de terminale peut comprendre le problème posé, cependant la question est bizarre, originale. La réponse à cette question est, elle, époustouflante.

Si Benoit Mandelbrot avait gardé pour lui le secret de cette génération en ne divulguant que le résultat artistique de ses recherches, jamais on aurait compris le principe générateur de ces formes d’une richesse infinie.

 

Cela choque beaucoup de personnes, mais de nombreux mathématiciens pensent que tout est nombre. Le réel physique d’existerait pas et l’univers  ne serait que le résultat de perceptions diverses.

En décomposant, la complexité on arrive à de simples fonctions primitives, finalement assez pauvres.

Jeune étudiant j’avais été choqué par l’énoncé du théorème de Fourier.

Ce théorème dit que tout signal cyclique, aussi complexe soit-il, peut se décomposer en une somme de vibrations à différentes fréquences.

Une vibration est une simple vague qui fait monter et descendre de façon continue, répétitive et monotone.

La vibration en tant que cycle rassure, car on sait qu’après être redescendu, on va remonter, puis redescendre. Ça ne finit jamais et c’est sans surprise.

La fonction mathématique qui porte cette vibration est la fonction Sinus.

N’ayant comme talent artistique que celui du contemplatif, j’ai imaginé des formes qui ne seraient que des sommes de vibrations, dans tous les sens, dans plusieurs dimensions. En les combinant, on génère des formes douces, organiques, qui rappelle des muscles, des viscères, un squelette. On repère quelques répétitions signant la simple vibration, la simple vague, la simple fonction sinus, mais ces répétitions ne se répètent pas complètement à l’identique et surprennent un peu dans leur rendu parce qu’elles sont simplement combinées avec d’autres. On entre progressivement dans le domaine du vivant, ou dans l’illusion du vivant.

 

Mon œil est surpris par le résultat. J’espère que le votre aussi.

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Pangloss Labs in Geneva

On the 12th of January a small, determined group met at Pangloss Labs in Ferney-Voltaire to discuss why there isn’t yet a Pangloss Labs Geneva site and what to do about it.
In a nutshell, although we have found some spaces in Geneva that meet our original half office / half workshop criteria, they are very few and far between.  With the rent costs being much higher in Geneva than neighbouring France, to replicate directly what we did in France would need 45 people willing to pay a proportion of the rent, before we have the space.   In addition, leases in Geneva tend to start at 5 years.  With some of the offers we have, on projects under development, we’d need 45 people willing to commit to contribute to a collaborative association for 5 years, starting in 1-2 years time.  That’s almost impossible to do.

So, with the facts on the table, and with the aid of some decent French wine, we brainstormed on the possible ways forward.  With lots of whiteboards, and different experiences and backgrounds we came up with the following plan:

  1. Make a list of all the spaces and similar initiatives around innovation in Grand Geneva.  Create working partnerships where possible.
  2. Simultaneously, use co-creation to decide amongst our Pangloss Labs community in Geneva, which set of Innovation Labs make sense for them.  This may well be a very different set from the 10 chosen in the Pays de Gex.
  3. Build up the space requirements for each Innovation Lab.  See if each Lab can start using time and space in existing physical spaces around Geneva.  If so, partner with the appropriate physical space, and do that, resulting in a win-win for Pangloss members and existing physical spaces, along with cross fertilisation between communities.

This doesn’t solve the problem of a large maker space in Geneva, but it does solve the problem of how to get the other Innovation Labs really working for those members unable to easily get to Ferney-Voltaire and it provides something concrete as a partnership with our other innovation space friends around Geneva.

Once things are up and running, we can decide if we need another physical space in Geneva, or if working collaboratively with existing spaces is sufficient.

What do you think?

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solar hydrogen generator

Solar Thermal Hydrogen Production – An Adventure

Fifty million tons of hydrogen are used every year mainly for making fertilizers and for refining petroleum. Today, it is also explored as an energy storage medium because electricity storage at large scale is costly and inefficient. Hydrogen can be used as a chemical, in particular to make hydrocarbons, so it can replace petroleum, and it is a source of clean power –for transportation for example- because its use results in water only and nothing else.

Wouldn’t it be great to make hydrogen in a clean and sustainable way?

The history of H2P began in 2001 on the premises of Creative Services s.a.r.l. with contemplations about what to do with acetylene. From a coffee table discussion the subject evolved into patent applications and the search for funds to realize the idea.

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The Business Benefits of Open Source Modular Design

The modular design of technology, facilitated by an open source approach, could be a key feature of a circular economy – and it could open up significant business advantage in the process.

This article was written by Pangloss Lab’s own Paul Bristow and published at Circulate News, the news website of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

Read it there:

 

open source modular design: the business benefits

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Business Benefits of Open Source Modular Design

The modular design of technology, facilitated by an open source approach, could be a key feature of a circular economy – and it could open up significant business advantage in the process.  This article was written by Paul and published at Circulate News, the news site of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

open source modular design: the business benefits

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